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The Blanket - A Journal of Protest & Dissent

Federal Unionism—Early Sinn Fein: Article 9

The Army, the Navy and the Air Force - an Irish Christian Liberal Democracy within the United Kingdom and the National Government of Ireland Act

Next in a series of articles submitted to the Blanket

Michael Gillespie • July 2006

The Act should define the territories known as the British Isles as the Isles of the North Atlantic.

The Act should State that the isles of the North Atlantic are divided into three distinct territories which are separate and apart;

  1. The territory of the Sovereign Nation of Ireland with its offshore islands and Rockall, where territory is Irish and its inhabitants are Irish with a distinctive flag - the Royal flag of Ireland which in the National flag of Ireland and is an equal symbol of the United Kingdom of the Sovereign Nation of Ireland and Great Britain. On Irish Territory the Sovereign Nation of Ireland has its own distinctive anthem. - A Nation Once Again;
  2. The territory of Great Britain where territory is British and the inhabitants are British with a distinctive flag - the Union flag which is the National flag of Great Britain and on British territory is a symbol of the united Kingdom of Great Britain and the Sovereign Nation of Ireland. The distinctive anthem of great Britain is God Save The Queen;
  3. The Isle of Man with its own identity. The Act should describe the Royal flag of Ireland in this manner. The flag of Ireland is the existing Irish tricolour with the Cross of Saint Patrick imposed on the white central panel. This divides the white section panel into four sections. On the top section there is a simple crown symbol in neutral colour. In the two sections to the right and left, there are two simple harp symbols in blue. In the bottom section there is the outline of a shamrock but of no colour.

The Act should State that both territories of the Isles of the North Atlantic are within the United Kingdom, the Isle of Man being the exception.

The Act should define the Army Acting in defence of the two territories of the Isles of the North Atlantic and in defence of Democracy as the United Kingdom Army.

The Act should define the United Kingdom Army as being divided into two commands, which are separate and apart.

  1. The Royal Irish Army whose personnel are Irish and whose maintenance, strength and deployment are the responsibility of the Taoiseach in Dail Eireann;
  2. The British Army whose personnel are British and whose maintenance, strength and deployment are the responsibility of the British Prime Minister and Westminster.

Under freedom to enter Irish territory on Lawful business and in a Lawful manner unhindered, the Act permits the entry of the British Army on short term visits to Irish territory in order to lawfully train and exercise, in joint military training in the field with the Royal Irish Army. On such short-term visits to Irish territory, by British Army personnel, the Act should stipulate as necessary that the British Army should announce before its arrival, a place and date of arrival, and a short-term place and date of departure in the press and media. It would then be clear that British personnel would be present as guests of the Irish People and in no other capacity and British Army personnel would be subject at all times to Irish State Law.

The Act should allow British Army personnel to mingle with and socialise with the Irish people when off duty but in doing so must be unarmed and act as guests of the Irish people at all times.

Under freedom to leave Irish Territory on Lawful business and in a Lawful manner unhindered. Royal Irish Army personnel would be free to enter British Territory in the short term to carry out training and military exercises with British Army personnel in great Britain. When the Royal Irish Army does so, it does so in the same understanding as applies to British Army personnel when being on Irish territory.

The Act should State clearly that except in times of War, no Army other than the Royal Irish Army, can maintain bases, barracks, fortifications, military buildings or structures on Irish territory.

The Act should State that personnel of the parachute regiment or of the S.A.S. are forbidden to enter Irish territory.

The Act should recommend that a school of military studies be set up in the universities where intending offices of the Royal Irish Army can undertake military studies and be fluent in Irish.

The Act should State that the Navy Acting in defence of both territories of the Isles of the North Atlantic and of democracy be defined as the United Kingdom Navy. This Navy is divided into two separate commands - the Royal Irish Navy whose strength, maintenance and deployment are the responsibility of the Taoiseach in Dail Eireann -and the Royal Navy whose strength, maintenance and deployment is the responsibilities of the British Prime Minister at West Ministers. Under freedom to enter Irish territory on lawful business and in a lawful manner unhindered, the Act permits Royal Navy warships armed with conventional weapons to enter Irish territorial waters and put in at Irish ports for short term announced courtesy visits. The crew can come ashore but when they do they must respect and abide by the Irish State Law. When the Royal Navy decides to make a courtesy to an Irish port on ports the Royal Navy must announce dates of arrival and short-term dates of departure.

The Act permits ships of the Royal Irish Navy to enter British Territorial waters and ports on the same understanding as applies to Royal Navy when in Irish Ports.

The Act should state that no Navy other than the Royal Irish Navy can maintain naval bases, naval barracks, naval fortifications, naval buildings or structures on Irish territory.

The Act defines the Air Force acting in defence of the territories of the Isles of the North Atlantic and of Democracy as the United Kingdom Air Force.

The Act should State that the United Kingdom Air Force is divided into two commands that are separate and apart.

  1. The Royal Irish Air Force whose personnel are Irish citizens and whose strength, maintenance and deployment are the responsibility of the Taoiseach at Dail Eireann;
  2. The Royal Air Force whose personnel are British citizens and whose strength, maintenance and deployment are the responsibility of the British Prime Minister at Westminister.

Under the freedom to enter Irish territory on Lawful business and in a Lawful manner unhindered, the Act permits war planes of the Royal Air Force to enter Irish Airspace on short term courtesy visits. - The Royal Air Forces making previously a date of arrival and date of departure from Irish territory.

By the same token, Aircraft of Royal Irish Air Force can enter British Airspace and put down at a British Military Airports in the short term and in the same understanding as applies to the Royal Air Force when on Irish territory.

The Act should State clearly that except in times of war, no Air Force other than the Royal Irish Air Force can maintain bases, erect barracks, fortifications, buildings or structures on Irish Territory.

The Act forbids the entry of British Nuclear submarines to Irish territorial water or to Irish ports.

The Act should state that when the Crown is on British territory the Crown is commander in chief of the British Army, the Royal Navy and the Royal Air Force.

The Act should State that where the Crown Irish is on Irish territory the Crown Irish is commander in chief of the Royal Irish Army, the Royal Irish Navy and the Royal Irish Air Force.

The Act should advise the Crown Irish that when carrying on the ceremonial role as commander in chief the Royal Irish Navy, the Crown Irish should wear a fashionable dress, designed by an Irish couturier or couturiere and be accompanied by the Secretary of State for Ireland and a senior officer in the Irish Guards. When carrying out the ceremonial role as commander in chief of the Royal Irish Navy, the Crown Irish should dress as already advised and be accompanied by a senior officer of the Royal Irish Navy in uniform and by the Secretary of State for Ireland

When carrying out the ceremonial role as commander in chief of the Royal Irish Air Force. The Crown Irish should dress as already advised and be accompanied by a senior officer in uniform from the Royal Irish Navy and the Secretary of State for Ireland.

The Act does not recommend the drinking of toasts to the Crown Irish by military personnel on Irish territory.

 

 

 

Next week, Schooling, and Marriage.





See Also:
Article 1: Democracy
Article 2: The Way of Life
Article 3: The Crown Irish
Article 4: Rights, Freedoms
Article 5: The Legal Profession
Article 6: Government Politics
Article 7: Religion
Article 8: Policing
Article 9: The Army, the Navy and the Air Force
Article 10: The Orange Order

Debate:
Dual Presidency More Realistic
A Dual Presidency: An Improbable Solution to the Irish Problem

Federalism


 

 

 


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The Blanket - A Journal of Protest & Dissent



 

 

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Index: Current Articles



10 September 2006

Other Articles From This Issue:

It's Good to Talk
Dr John Coulter

Bye-Bye Daily Lies
Geraldine Adams

Peelers Give You Trouble
Martin Galvin

If You Cannot Organise a Meeting, How Can You Expect to Organise a Revolution?
Liam O Comain

RSF not involved in proposed 'Front'
Republican Sinn Fein Press Release

Renaissance Republicanism
Mick Hall

Goulding, the Provisionals and the Current Political Process
Roy Johnston

Puppet Show
John Kennedy

Fr. Mc Manus on His Visit to Garnerville PSNI Training Center
Fr Sean Mc Manus

Irlande du Nord: Interview With Anthony McIntyre
André Poulin

Sectarian Interfaces: Glenn Patterson's That Which Was
Seaghán Ó Murchú

Federal Unionism—Early Sinn Fein: Article 9
Michael Gillespie

Federal Unionism—Early Sinn Fein: Article 10
Michael Gillespie

A Curious Snub
Fred A. Wilcox

Con Artist
John Kennedy

Against Civilisation
Seamus Mac An tSaoir

Blanket Coverage for All
Carrie Twomey

5 Years
Brian Mór


3 September 2006

Sinn Fein: Or the Party of Symbolic Republicanism
David Kruidenier

Public Commitment or Public Relations
Martin Galvin

Suits You, Sir
John Kennedy

False Memory Syndrome
Ray McAreavey

True Faith
Eamon Sweeney

Not the Cathal Goulding I Knew
Liam O Comain

Dark Days Ahead
John Kennedy

Return to Conflict No Alternative
David Adams

Sir Reg's Party Games
Anthony McIntyre

A Secret History of Irish Music
Seaghán Ó Murchú

Unionism's Favourite Nationalist
Dr John Coulter

Federal Unionism—Early Sinn Fein: Article 7
Michael Gillespie

Federal Unionism—Early Sinn Fein: Article 8
Michael Gillespie

Trotsky and the Ghetto of the Sects
Mick Hall

Global Conscience Not US Capital: The Case for Liberal Intervention
Gabriel Glickman

Letter to Bertie
Michael McKevitt Justice Campaign

 

 

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