The Blanket

The Blanket - A Journal of Protest & Dissent

Federal Unionism—Early Sinn Fein: Article 15 - 22

Remembrance Day

Sport

The National Graves of Ireland

Visiting Foreign Heads of State or Foreign Dignitaries

Christian Reconciliation, Forgiveness and Peace

The Media

The National State Universities of Ireland

The Holding of Referenda

 

An Irish Christian Liberal Democracy within the United Kingdom and the National Government of Ireland Act

This concludes the series of articles submitted to the Blanket

Michael Gillespie • July 2006

Article 15: Remembrance Day

The Act should specify that the period of remembrance in Ireland be of the same length, as is the period of remembrance in Great Britain.

The Act should state that the period of remembrance recalls all Irish citizens who have lost their lives in conflicts either on Irish territory or on foreign territory.

The Act should recognise that the poppy is a British emblem and for that reason is controversial to Ireland. For that reason the Act should forbid the wearing of a poppy by an Irish citizen.

The Act should specify that during the period of remembrance an Irish citizen should wear an internationally recognised symbol of peace such as a white dove.

The Act should stipulate as necessary that during the period of remembrance public figures, but not Clerics wear a white dove of peace.

The Act should specify that on remembrance day a parade be held in Dublin, headed by the Secretary of State for Ireland, the Taoiseach followed by four senior Clerics in church in alphabetical order, followed by a detachment of Irish guards, followed by a detachment of Military Personnel from the Royal Irish Army lead by an Irish general, followed by personnel from the Garda Siochana, followed by personnel from the Provincial Police from the four provinces, each Police Provincial personnel being lead by the leader of the appropriate Provincial House of Representatives, followed by a Military band playing solemn music. The procession which should be Military and Police only and should exclude civilians from the procession under the act.

The Act recommends that he procession starts at the General Post Office in Dublin and proceeds to a Christian Church where an ecumenical Service will be held. The Service should include all of the TD's from the Dail Eireann and also civilians.


Article 16: Sport

Under freedom of choice, expression and behaviour, the Act should permit the playing of all sporting Activities, athletic Activities, games and pastimes, which are internationally recognised, as being such.

The Act should give special recognition to the Gaelic Athletic Association. However if membership of the GAA remains Catholic and therefore Church, the Act should restrict the playing of Gaelic Games to Catholic Church territory. If the GAA States that its membership is open to all Christians or non Christians into its ranks, the Act will define the GAA as State and Christian In that case the Act will define the GAA as the Royal Gaelic Athletic Association and will confer on the GAA the Crown Irish special freedom of access to Irish territory in all its aspects and to all building without hindrance in order to promote but not impose the playing of Gaelic Games.

The Act should also confer on all Irish citizens the Crown Irish special freedom of access to membership of the GAA

The Act recommends that the Heir to the Throne becomes patron of the GAA

The Act should recommend that all-Ireland finals in Croke Park be attended by the Heir to the Throne, the Secretary of State for Ireland, the Taoiseach and by the four leaders of the Provincial House of Representatives

The Act should recommend that all-Ireland finals in football and hurling be policed by the Garda Siochana and by members of the four Provincial Police Services

The Act should stipulate as necessary that the Royal flag of Ireland along with the four Provincial flags be displayed, the Irish National Anthem - A Nation Once Again be sung and that the Artane Boys Band parade the pitch at all-Ireland finals.


Article 17: The National Graves of Ireland

The Act should deem it appropriate to honour the dead in Ireland. For that reason a National Graves Honours list should be drawn up by the Supreme Council of Irish Jurists accepting any suggestions from the general public and draw up the list in a liberal frame of mind.

The Act should suggest that the list include those who are dead, lost, have given their lives in outstanding Service, either at home or abroad such as:

  • To Christianity
  • To Politics
  • To freedom
  • To industry
  • To business
  • To the creation of wealth
  • To the environment
  • To literature
  • To music either classical or popular
  • To the arts including film
  • To dance
  • To Democracy
  • To military matters
  • To sporting and athletic activities

And any other category deemed appropriate by the Supreme Council of Irish Jurists

The Act should state it is a duty of the Irish guards to inspect and maintain the National Graves regularly and to keep in display and in good order, the Royal flag of Ireland along with the four Provincial flags

The Act should forbid the holding of an assembly at any National grave and the making of speeches.

The Act should encourage Irish citizens to visit the National graves but are advised to place a wreath on the grave and allow the incumbent to rest in peace.


Article 18: Visiting Foreign Heads of State or Foreign Dignitaries

The Act should make provisions for State visits by Foreign Heads of State and Foreign Dignitaries to Ireland.

The Act should state that the visitors have the following State ceremony.

The Act recommends that the visitor attends Dail Eireann where the Crown Irish wearing the Irish Crown jewels is present along with the Secretary of State for Ireland the Taoiseach and all the TDs. The visitor would be obliged to state the nature and purpose of his or her visit. When Dail Eireann is thus addressed the TDs will then vote on the matter. On a majority, the Crown Irish will present a scroll to the visitor conferring to the visitor, the Crown Irish special right of access to Irish territory in all its aspects to every nook and cranny of the environment and to all buildings. On this understanding the visitor will plan his or her itinerary

On this understanding the Pope could make a State visit to Ireland, the Pope being the Head of State for the Vatican City, Head of the Roman Catholic Church and being recognised in the Act as being Christian in belief, in moral outlook, in behaviour in religious practise and in speech.

However a visiting Foreign Head of State or Foreign Dignitary can only make a State visit to Ireland by an invitation from the Taoiseach.

If the Taoiseach is to issue an invitation to the Pope to make a State visit to Ireland the request for such a visit must be made jointly by the Heads of the Four Christian Churches named in the Act.

On making a State visit to Ireland under freedom to worship according to personal conscience, the Pope would be free to say mass in public. Should the Secretary of State for Ireland the Taoiseach, TDs, representatives of the four Provincial Houses attend the Pope saying mass, they do so in a private capacity and are not representative of the Irish State.

Should the Pope chose to attend a State Christian Act of worship, the Service must be ecumenical as laid down in the Act.


Article 19: Christian Reconciliation, Forgiveness and Peace

The Act should recognise the need for reconciliation, forgiveness and peace in Ireland.

The Act should make provision for the setting up of a Crown Irish State Christian Chapel of reconciliation, forgiveness and peace.

For this purpose the Act should recommend the use of the chapel Kilmainim for Irish services in this way.

Under the Act this chapel in Kilmainim should be re-consecrated in a joint Christian ceremony conducted by four Senior Clerics from each one of the four Christian Churches named in the Act.

The Act should recommend that the Roman Catholic Altar be removed and placed in a museum and be replaced by a plain wooden table above which is a full length Celtic Cross. The chapel should display the Crown Irish Representation, the Royal Irish flag along with the 4 Provincial flags, a lectern, a clock showing the time of day and calendar showing the day, the month and the year.

The Act should stipulate as necessary that on every Easter Sunday an ecumenical Service of reconciliation, forgiveness and peace be held in the chapel attended by the Crown Irish wearing the Irish Crown jewels, attended by four senior Christian Clerics, by the Secretary of State for Ireland, the Taoiseach. all the TDs from Dail Eireann along with the four leaders of the Provincial Houses of Representatives.

The Act recommends that the service begins with the firing of a volley of shots in the courtyard of Kilmainim jail the command being given hi the Irish language by the Irish Guards.

The Act expects that the Irish Guards will enter the chapel hearing arms. The Religious Service will then begin, the Service being given by one of the Christian Clerics, the order in which the Cleric is chosen annually, being determined by the alphabetical order of the Churches.

During the rest of the year the chapel should be in use for talks, lectures and discussions on aspects of ecumenism with the ecumenical Services being held regularly in the chapel.

The Act stipulates as necessary that the Christian Service and its ritual be replayed by Radio Telefis Eireann and by National radio to the Irish Nation.


Article 20: The Media

The Act should recognise Radio Telefis Eireann as the National State television for Ireland.

The Act should also make provisions for the establishment of four Provincial television stations, Connacht television, Leinster television, Munster television, and Ulster television, provided by either the State or by advertisement or by both.

The Act again recognises the Irish and English languages are of equal status.

The Act should allow the setting up of independent television Stations funded by advertisement.

In the Act, the media are underpinned by freedom of thought, speech, behaviour, and expression, to be creative and imaginative, to entertain and be entertained, and to educate within the Law

The Act should also allow radio broadcasting Nationally, Provincially, and locally, radio being underpinned by the same freedoms, as is television.


Article 21: The National State Universities of Ireland

The Act should recognise the following universities as comprising the National State universities of Ireland:

  1. Trinity College, Dublin
  2. University College, Dublin
  3. Dublin City, University
  4. The University of Maynooth
  5. The University of Limerick
  6. University College Cork
  7. University College Galway
  8. The University of Ulster
  9. The Queens University, Belfast

The Act should recommend that the Queens University of Belfast change its charter to the Crown Irish University of Belfast.

The universities are underpinned by freedom of thought, mind, speech, expression, to educate and to be educated, to be imaginative and creative, to experiment, to dissent in speech or in writing, to challenge in speech or in writing and freedom of behaviour within the Law and any other freedom that is deemed appropriate to university life.

The Act should recognise the Irish Congress of Trade Unions as the representative body for Trade Unions in Ireland.

The Act stipulates as necessary that all Trade Unions in Ireland affiliate to the ICTU and that no Trade Union in Ireland can be affiliated to the Trades Union Congress in Great Britain.

The Act strongly recommends that the Ulster Teachers Union and the Irish National teacher's Organisation come together and work together in a joint Teachers Union.

The Mail Service

The Act should state the Mail Service in Ireland is known as the Crown Irish Mail Service.

The Act should State that the Crown Irish Mail Service vans be coloured green and that an Irish stamp should show the Crown Irish Representation.


Article 22: The Holding of Referenda

The Act should make provision for the holding of a 32 county referendum in Ireland. The provision has problems. In such a referendum the Catholic majority will swamp the Protestant minority. To avoid this, the Act should stipulate as necessary that in a thirty-two county referendum the votes in the twenty-six counties and the votes in the six counties be counted separately. Under this provision in the Act an all Ireland referendum would have three outcomes.

Firstly where there is a significant majority vote in favour of the referendum in both territories the referendum is carried.

Secondly where there is a significant majority votes against the referendum in both the territories the referendum is defeated.

Thirdly where the referendum is supported by a significant majority in one territory but is defeated by a significant majority in the other, the referendum in this case is inconclusive.

A National State referendum should be drawn up as follows:

Do you wish Ireland to be:

  1. A Sovereign Nation within the United Kingdom with the National government of Ireland Act as its constitution.
  2. A republic with the 1937 constitution as its constitution.

In the provision made in the Act for the holding of an all Ireland referendum the National State referendum would have these possible outcomes.

If a significant majority in both territories upholds an option "A" then Ireland is united as a Sovereign Nation within the United Kingdom. In that case, unlike Great Britain the Crown Irish would have been democratically elected. In that case the Irish problem will be solved.

If at a future time there should arise widespread dissatisfaction with the Crown Irish among the people, in the press, in the media and in the Churches, the Act should authorise the Taoiseach to put the National State referendum to the people.

If option "B" is upheld by a significant majority in both territories Ireland will be united as a Republic and the Irish problem is solved.

If option "A" is upheld by a significant majority in the six counties and option "B" is upheld by a significant majority in the twenty six counties then the referendum will be inconclusive and Ireland will remained partitioned and the Irish problem will remain unsolved.

Where Ireland remains partitioned the constitution of Northern Ireland would be the written constitution the National Government of Ireland Act that having being upheld by a significant majority in the six counties and Northern Ireland would have a stable constitution.

With the National Government of Ireland Act as the written constitution of Northern Ireland, it would then be a constitutional imperative that English Soldiers, Scottish Soldiers and Welsh Soldiers leave Northern Ireland lock, stock and barrel and take the Union Jack with them, the Royal Irish Regiment remaining in Northern Ireland acting in defence of Irish territory and in defence of Democracy.

Constituted as such Northern Ireland would have one Head of State, one flag, one Government elected by the people, one anthem and one passport. The powers invested in Dail Eireann would be taken up by Westminster and the authority to be devolved to the House of Ulster would be decided by the British Prime Minister and the leader of the Ulster House of Representatives in discussion. Under the Act, Northern Ireland would return MPS to Westminster.

The Act should State that the Government of Ireland Act can be amended as follows

  1. In a minor way by the Taoiseach with the majority support of Dail Eireann
  2. In a major way. Where Dail Eireann amends the Act in this way, the amendment must have the support of Westminster and then be put to the Irish people in a referendum.

Procedure

To bring the National government of Ireland Act into existence, a moderate centre would have to come together in Northern Ireland drawn from the Official Unionist, the SDLP and the Alliance Party and be under the banner of Federal Unionism - Early Sinn Fein. This Party should seek a mandate from the people of Northern Ireland to write the National Government of Ireland Act. If such a mandate is found the Act should be composed at Stormont by the elected Representatives.

A draft having been drawn up, the draft would need discussion by all bodies involved in the Act. That done, the Act should be presented to Westminster for debate and ratification.

When ratified, copies of the Act in Irish and English should be distributed to the Irish people for discussion

When the Act has been internalised by the Irish people the National State Referendum should be put to the people and a Democratic solution to the Irish problem arrived at.

Federal Unionism - Early Sinn Fein


See Also:
Article 1: Democracy
Article 2: The Way of Life
Article 3: The Crown Irish
Article 4: Rights, Freedoms
Article 5: The Legal Profession
Article 6: Government Politics
Article 7: Religion
Article 8: Policing
Article 9: The Army, the Navy and the Air Force
Article 10: The Orange Order
Article 11: Schooling
Article 12: Marriage
Article 13: The Family
Article 14: Culture

Article 15: Remembrance Day
Article 16: Sport
Article 17: The National Graves of Ireland
Article 18: Visiting Foreign Heads of State or Foreign Dignitaries
Article 19: Christian Reconciliation, Forgiveness and Peace
Article 20: The Media
Article 21: The National State Universities of Ireland
Article 22: The Holding of Referenda

Debate:
Dual Presidency More Realistic
A Dual Presidency: An Improbable Solution to the Irish Problem

Federalism

 

 

 


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The Blanket - A Journal of Protest & Dissent



 

 

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Index: Current Articles



10 October 2006

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To Deal or Not
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One Small Step for Paisley, One Giant Step for Ireland?
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The Haunting
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Subversion of an Irish Peace Plan
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Working Class Hero
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Federal Unionism—Early Sinn Fein: Article 15 - 22
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Racism: The Social Cancer
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Forced Out
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Teflon Kid
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When Fear Trumps Reason
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Stay Out of Neo-Con Mire
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Who really is the Biblical Anti Christ?
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Serving Judas, Not Justice
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