The Blanket

The Blanket - A Journal of Protest & Dissent

Federal Unionism—Early Sinn Fein: Article 3

The Crown Irish - An Irish Christian Liberal Democracy within the United Kingdom and the National Government of Ireland Act

Next in a series of articles submitted to the Blanket

Michael Gillespie • July 2006

The Act should State that on coronation the Crown is Head of State of Great Britain and the Sovereign Nation of Ireland.

The Act should State that when the Crown is on Irish territory, the Crown is known in Ireland as the Crown Irish and is Head of State of the Sovereign Nation of Ireland.

The Act should State that when the Crown Irish is on Irish territory, the Crown Irish is recognised as being Christian in belief, moral outlook and behaviour in religious practice and in speech.

The Act should State that the official Religion of the Sovereign Nation of Ireland is Christian Ecumenism. The Crown Irish being recognised as being Christian and Head of State of the Sovereign Nation of Ireland and is therefore head of Christian Ecumenism in Ireland.

The Act should State that on Coronation the Act confers on the Crown Irish, the Crown Irish special right of access to Irish territory in all its aspects, to every nook and cranny of the environment, to every organisation, institution, profession and to all groupings, either public, social or private, to all buildings, structures and dwellings on Irish territory, the Crown Irish special right of access being unhindered.

The Act should State that when the Crown Irish is on Irish territory the Crown Irish is restricted to attend only Christian Ecumenical Services. Cm doing so the Act should State that when the Crown Irish attends a Christian Ecumenical Service the Crown Irish must be attended by the Secretary of State for Ireland, the Taoiseach, four senior Clerics coming from each of the four Churches defined in the Act as Christian. If one of these four senior Clerics declines to attend the ecumenical Service then the Crown Irish must also decline. If during a Christian ecumenical Service a senior Cleric withdraws, the Crown Irish and the Secretary of State for Ireland must also withdraw from the Service along with the dissenting Cleric

The Act should advise the Crown Irish not to ride in a horse drawn carriage, when in Ireland, but is advised to travel only by means of modern transport.

The Act should advise the Crown Irish not to ride on horseback, on State occasions but may do so for recreational or sporting purposes in private.

The Act should advise the Crown Irish to address an Irish citizen by Mr, Mrs, or Miss and by the second name, or at the discretion of the Crown Irish by the first name.

The Act advises the Crown Irish not to address an Irish citizen as subject.

The Act should State that when an Irish citizen is addressing the Crown Irish, the Crown Irish is addressed as Your Majesty.

Where an Irish citizen is addressing the heir to the throne, the Irish citizen should address the heir to the throne as Your Royal Highness.

The Act advises the Crown Irish not to confer upon an Irish citizen a British title or a British honour.

The Act should make provision for the Crown Irish to confer Irish honours on Irish citizens.

The Act recommends that the Crown Irish confer the honour the Order of St Patrick on men and the Order of St Bridget on women, in a twice-annual ceremony at Dublin Castle.

The Act States that is the duty of the Supreme Council of Irish Jurists to draw up a twice-annual list of Irish citizens deserving to be honoured by the Crown Irish.

On being presented with a medallion, giving the order that is being conferred, the medallion should show the Crown Irish representation, a presentation engraved in Irish crystal and a monitory award, the amount being set by the Supreme Council of Irish Jurists.

The Act should recommend that when a picture of the Crown Irish is displayed on Irish territory, the picture must show a Celtic Cross on top, and the name of the Crown Irish should be written on the bottom in both the Irish and English languages.

The Act should advise the Crown Irish to restore the Irish Crown Jewels to Ireland, to be kept under maximum security in Dublin Castle.

The Act recommends that in the Crown Irish representation, the Crown Irish should be dressed fashionably the dress being designed by an Irish Couturier or an Irish Couturiere. The Crown Irish in the picture should wear the Crown Irish jewels.

Since the Act confers on the Crown Irish the right of access to all buildings, The Crown Irish can of right enter Dublin Castle.

Under this right, the Act recognises that the Crown Irish can have a Royal Suite of residence in Dublin Castle. This right of access is restricted only to the Crown Irish and the Crown Irish spouse, to the heir of the throne and their spouse. No other member of the Royal Family is accorded this right.

The Act recommends that all other members of the Royal Family visit Ireland regularly but when they do so, they do so in a private capacity and are unconnected with the Irish State.

The Act States that the only flag to be flown in Dublin Castle is the Royal Flag of Ireland and the four Provincial flags. When the Crown Irish is in residence the Royal Standard can be displayed.

The Act advises the Crown Irish that the staff in the Royal Suite of Residence be Irish citizens. Where a vacancy arises the vacancy should be advertised in the press. The Act forbids the staff of the Royal suite of residence to go on strike. Where dissatisfaction should arise over pay or conditions of Service, the dissatisfaction should be placed before the Supreme Council of Irish Jurists and a ruling requested.

The Act should State that the security of the Crown Irish and Dublin Castle is placed in the hands of the Irish Guards at Dublin Castle. These should be Irish citizens and be fully trained in the techniques of modern warfare. In Dublin Castle the Irish Guards should wear the same uniform and regalia as the Irish Guards at Buckingham Palace. The Act permits the protocol of the changing of the guard.

The Act should make provision for the Crown Irish to be paid an annual salary by the Irish State. The salary should be set by the Supreme Council of Irish Jurists and should be commensurate with the salary paid to the president of a European Democratic Republic and take into account the current performance of the Irish Economy.

The Act advises the Crown Irish to have the annual salary paid into a Crown Irish account held in the Central Bank of Ireland and not into the Bank of England.

The Act advises that all financial transactions entered into by the Crown Irish on Irish territory be transacted through the Crown Irish account in the Central Bank of Ireland and not through the Bank of England.

The Act should State that it is the duty of the Crown Irish to hold an Irish State opening of Dail Eireann. On this occasion, the Crown Irish is advised not to wear robes but to dress in the manner of a fashionable Irish citizen, the dress being designed by an Irish Couturier or an Irish Couturiere,

The Act advises the Crown Irish to wear the Irish Crown Jewels but not a Crown, the Crown Irish jewels being placed on the Crown Irish by the Secretary of State for Ireland. The Crown Irish should administer the Taoiseach's solemn promise of office and to then address Dail Eireann, outlining the policies of the incoming Government.

It is advised in the Act that the Crown Irish address Dail Eireann as the Irish Government.

The Act stipulates as necessary, that the Crown Irish be constitutionally neutral and cannot vote in an Irish election either National or Provincial.

The Act stipulates as necessary that the Crown Irish representation be placed in a position of prominence inside all State buildings on Irish territory.

The Act recommends that the Irish State opening of Dail Eireann be relayed to the Irish people through the media.

The Act should State that when the Secretary of State for Ireland attends the Crown Irish, the Crown Irish is in public. When not attended by the Secretary of State for Ireland, the Crown Irish is in private.

 

Next week, the Legal Profession and Government Politics.



See Also:
Article 1: Democracy
Article 2: The Way of Life
Article 3: The Crown Irish
Article 4: Rights, Freedoms
Article 5: The Legal Profession
Article 6: Government Politics
Article 7: Religion
Article 8: Policing
Article 9: The Army, the Navy and the Air Force
Article 10: The Orange Order

Debate:
Dual Presidency More Realistic
A Dual Presidency: An Improbable Solution to the Irish Problem

Federalism







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The Blanket - A Journal of Protest & Dissent



 

 

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Index: Current Articles



21 August 2006

Other Articles From This Issue:

Throwing the Book at Gerry
John Kennedy

The Man With the Planter Name
Liam O Comain

Diplock Delay Equals Justice Denied
Martin Galvin

Kevin Lynch, INLA Volunteer
Ray Collins

1981 Hunger Strike Commemoration in Chicago
Richard Wallace

The Question of Paisley's Legacy
Dr John Coulter

Turf War
John Kennedy

Eoin O’Duffy’s biography by Fearghal McGarry
Seaghán Ó Murchú

The Proclamation to Me
Mick Hall

Federal Unionism—Early Sinn Fein: Article 3
Michael Gillespie

Federal Unionism—Early Sinn Fein: Article 4
Michael Gillespie

House on Notting Hill
Dr John Coulter

Courage, Muslim Leaders
David Adams

Middle East Conflict Has Abandoned Rules of War
Anthony McIntyre

A Warning From History
John Kennedy

Cartoon Commissar
Anthony McIntyre

The Letters page has been updated.


13 August 2006

Hunger Strike Anniversary
Martin Galvin

"Let the Fight Go On"
Willie Gallagher

Apology Owed
The Family of Volunteer Patsy O'Hara, INLA

Right the Wrong
Harry Boland

It's Who You Talk To
Dr John Coulter

As They Were Made They Were Matched
Liam O Comain

Poacher Turned Gamekeeper
John Kennedy

Criminality Figures Do Not Add Up
David Adams

The Siege of Derry
Anthony McIntyre

Repeat After Me: No Gods, No Masters
Mick Hall

Dual Presidency More Realistic
Nathan Dowds

Federal Unionism—Early Sinn Fein: Article 2
Michael Gillespie

Santa Coming Early
Dr John Coulter

Media Matters
Anthony McIntyre

Light, Freedom & Song: A Cultural History of Modern Irish Writing
Seaghán Ó Murchú

Pass the Gravy
John Kennedy

ILIR is Blowing the Green Card Game for the Irish
Patrick Hurley

From Belfast to the Middle East
Davy Carlin

Manifesto of the Third Camp
Anthony McIntyre

 

 

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