The Blanket

The Blanket - A Journal of Protest & Dissent

Federal Unionism—Early Sinn Fein: Article 11 & 12

Schooling

Marriage

An Irish Christian Liberal Democracy within the United Kingdom and the National Government of Ireland Act

Next in a series of articles submitted to the Blanket

Michael Gillespie • July 2006

Article 11: Schooling

The Act should stipulate as necessary that the Irish State provide schools of good quality in each of the four United Provinces of Ireland. The Act should not define what a school of good quality is, that should be left to those with expertise in architecture to elaborate on.

The Act should State the official Religion of Irish State schools is Christian-ecumenical, the ethos of the school being Christian.

That given the Act should recommend two curricula for Irish State schools.

  1. A National curriculum in Christian studies
  2. A National curriculum in secular studies

The Act should recommend that a panel of experts' in Religious education and its teaching come together to draw up a National curriculum in Christian studies detailing what is to be taught in Christian studies but not how Christian studies are to be taught. The panel should be drawn equally from the four Churches recognised in the Act as Christian. Such a curriculum being drawn up, what is taught in Christian studies should be the same in all schools in Ireland. How Christian studies are to be taught should be left to the universities and university colleges of education to expand upon. The lecturer in the university can be either Lay or Clerical and should hold State qualifications of a high order in Christian studies. The panel of experts drawing up what should be taught in Christian studies can be either Lay or Clerical.

The Act should recommend that Christian studies be underpinned by such freedoms as freedom of mind, freedom of thought, freedom of expression, freedom to be creative and imaginative, freedom to discuss, freedom to challenge in speech or in writing, freedom to dissent in speech or in writing, freedom of choice.

Because of that, the Act should state that attendance at the curriculum studies is not compulsory. Where a parent objects to what us being taught in Christian studies or how it is being taught, the parent can withdraw the pupil from Christian studies and have the pupil educated privately at home, in Church, Mosque, aSynagogue or Temple.

The Act recommends the study of non-Christian Religions in Christian studies.

The Act recognises the principle recognised in the United Kingdom constitution that the individual be educated according to personal conscience. For that reason non-Christians in Ireland should have schools of their own, the schools being provided by the Irish State.

The Act should make provisions for the holding of State examinations in Christian studies, the examinations being of a high order and are set by either Lay person or Cleric who holds a State recognised qualification, the examination being marked by either a Lay person or a Cleric.

The Act should recognise that either a Layperson or a Cleric can teach Christian studies in an Irish State school provided the Layperson or Cleric holds recognised State qualification to do so.

The Act should State that it is the intention of the Irish State to promote Christianity through schooling but not to impose Christianity on anyone who doesn't want it.

The Act should recommend that those who have experience of teaching and an in-depth knowledge of education should be brought together in a panel to draw up a National Secular Curriculum for Ireland. The curriculum should recognise an academic, technical and vocational education suited to the educational needs of the individual.

The Act should state that secular curriculum can be taught by either a Lay person or Cleric provided the Lay person or Cleric holds State recognised qualification to do so.

The Act should make provisions for the holding of State examinations of a high order in academic attainment, technical skills and vocational training.

The Act should forbid corporal punishment in schools

The Act should state that it is obligatory to hold a morning assembly. The nature of morning assembly is left to the school principal to decide. The Act expects that morning assembly will contain a spiritual and moral dimension. The Act stipulates that the morning assembly ends with the singing of the Irish National anthem - A Nation Once Again.

The Act States that the secular National curriculum is underpinned by freedom of mind, freedom of though, freedom to be creative and imaginative, freedom of speech, freedom to discuss, freedom to experiment, freedom to dissent in speech or in writing, freedom to challenge in speech or in writing, freedom of choice, freedom of behaviour. However freedom of behaviour is qualified but the rules and regulation of the school and by the expectations of the principal, by the rules and regulation of the classroom and by the expectations of the classroom teacher. The Act should state that behaviour and discipline in the school is the duty and responsibility of the parents. Where a pupil or group of pupils in the school are badly behaved or in disciplined, the Act recommends that the principal verbally caution the parent. If bad behaviour or indiscipline still exists and after all psychological approaches have been exhausted, the Act empowers the principal to expel the pupil or group of pupils from the school.

The Act should State that Irish State school can be all girls, all boys or coeducational

The Act stipulates that the Royal flag of Ireland with the flag of the province in which the school is situated be flown in school grounds. The Act advises that it is the duty of the school vice principal to raise the flags at the beginning of the teaching day and lower the flags at the end of the teaching day

The Act should State that the principal of an Irish State school can be either Lay or Clerical provided the Lay person or Cleric holds recognised State qualifications on appointed.

The Act recognises integrated schools in Ireland and recommends such schools as educationally worthwhile.

The Act recognises that some schools teach the curriculum through the medium of Irish. The Act should recommend such educational practise as worthwhile.

The Act should make provision for the setting up of a State Inspectorate in both Christian studies and in secular studies; the inspectorate should inspect State schools on a regular basis. The inspectorate in Christian studies can be either Lay or Clerical holding high quality State qualifications, and be widely experienced in the teaching of Christian studies. Where on inspection a school is found defective in what is taught in Christian studies, or how Christian studies are being taught, the Act empowers the State to dismiss the Head of Christian studies and appoint a new head.

The Act makes provision for a State inspectorate in secular studies the inspectors being made up of persons either by Lay or Clerical, who hold State qualifications of a high order and who have wide experience in the teaching of secular studies. If on inspection, a school is found to be defective in what is being taught in secular studies or how secular studies are being taught, the Act empowers the State to dismiss the school principal and vice principal and appoint a new principal and vice principal.

The Act recommends the school principal appoint a Cleric or Clerics to Act as Spiritual director, or Spiritual directors to the pupil population.

The Act should State that attendance at the secular curriculum is compulsory.


Article 12: Marriage

The Act should recognise the Crown Irish right to marry and raise a family. The Act confers this right on all Irish citizens of adult years.

Under the Act Church and State are separate the state having no powers over the Church, Mosque, Synagogue or Temple.

This gives rise to difficulties in the enactment of divorce legislation in the Irish State

To get around this the Act should recommend that marriage in Ireland be two fold:

  1. An Irish State marriage
  2. A marriage contract contracted in a Church Mosque Synagogue or Temple

An Irish State marriage should be a legal contract drawn up by the Supreme Council of Irish Jurist, giving the status of the couple in marriage the rights, duties and the responsibilities of the couple to one another, the rights, duties and responsibilities of the parents to the children of the marriage and the rights of children. The marriage should be contracted in a solicitor's office and the solicitor should explain the nature of the legal contract in full to the contracting couple. The solicitor should then issue the contracting couple with an Irish State marriage certificate signed by the solicitor, the contracting couple and two witnesses. The couple will then be legally married. The Act should strongly recommend when issuing an Irish State marriage certificate to a contracting couple that the solicitor advises the contracting couple to marry in a Church Synagogue, Mosque or Temple. When such a marriage ceremony is entered into the officiating Cleric must be shown an Irish State marriage certificate. If the contracting couple cannot show an Irish State marriage certificate to the officiating Cleric, the Act should forbid the officiating Cleric to marry such a couple. When the Irish State marriage certificate has been issued to a contracting couple, if one of the parties break the legal contract in a major way, the offended partner can have the Irish State marriage certificate declared null and void in court.

The Act should make clear that when an Irish State marriage certificate is declared null and void in court that does not apply to a marriage certificate issued by a Church, Mosque, Synagogue or Temple.

The Act should recognise that there can exist an abiding affection and commitment between same sex couples. Under freedom of behaviour freedom of mind, will and choice the Irish State can issue an Irish State marriage certificate to same sex couples, the marriage contract being drawn up by the Supreme Council of Irish Jurists. Where one partner in a same sex relationship breaks the marriage contract in a major way, the offended partner can have the Irish State marriage certificate declared null and void in court.

The Act should State that the age of consent to sex is sixteen.

Where the Crown Irish or heir to the throne intends to marry, under freedom of mind, will and choice the Crown Irish or heir to the throne is free to marry a spouse of personal choice, the spouse being, moral outlook, behaviour, religious practise and in speech.

Under the freedom of mind, choice, will, behaviour, the sexual behaviour of adult same sex couple in private is of no concern of the Irish State.





See Also:
Article 1: Democracy
Article 2: The Way of Life
Article 3: The Crown Irish
Article 4: Rights, Freedoms
Article 5: The Legal Profession
Article 6: Government Politics
Article 7: Religion
Article 8: Policing
Article 9: The Army, the Navy and the Air Force
Article 10: The Orange Order
Article 11: Schooling
Article 12: Marriage
Article 13: The Family
Article 14: Culture

Debate:
Dual Presidency More Realistic
A Dual Presidency: An Improbable Solution to the Irish Problem

Federalism


 

 

 

 


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25 September 2006

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