The Blanket

The Blanket - A Journal of Protest & Dissent

The Framing of Michael McKevitt: Rupert's Reward

Excerpt from the booklet, The Framing of Michael McKevitt

The Blanket is serialising the booklet.

Marcella Sands • 22 June 2006

Rupert’s total take as a result of the conviction has been estimated at around $5 million. This consists of an acknowledged $1.5 million from the FBI up to the year 2000, plus a similar payment from MI5 through the pro rata agreement for services to them, plus a reported $50,000 per month for life and a substantial percentage of the profits of a book on his life and times in Ireland being ghost-written by two US journalists. Much of these payments were dependent on the conviction of Michael McKevitt. Acquittal in the trial would have been a financial disaster for David Rupert. It also would have been a major embarrassment for MI5, the FBI the Gardai and the Irish DPP’s office.

An undated and heavily censored MI5 file note made available on discovery reads: “Rupert volunteered he was a “whore” … and his motive is money. He had earlier told the FBI that he hoped the money would not dry up …During the disclosure hearing in October 2002 the English Barrister Simon Dennison was asked by Defence lawyer Philip McGee S.C., did he agree that Rupert’s motivation was financial, Mr Dennison replied he was in agreement that Rupert was financially motivated.

An undated MI5 paper says: “On November 28th, 2000, when discussing the possibility of giving evidence against McKevitt, Rupert stated that his participation (in any prosecution of McKevitt) was dependent upon the right terms. He asked his handlers what the figures were. He was told it was vital to avoid any suggestion that his testimony had been induced by some promise of reward. He could not be rewarded for his testimony. He could be compensated for his loss of earning potential; the impact on his lifestyle and arrangements could be made for the necessary security measures to be taken to ensure his protection for as long as they were needed. The language used was for legal reasons to avoid the perception of inducement to him.

As a veteran performer in State and Federal courts since 1974 Rupert was clearly at ease with the cut and thrust of cross-examination. When Mr Hugh Hartnett S.C trapped him into contradicting himself he resorted to the expression so beloved of some witnesses at the Dublin Castle tribunals of saying “he could not recall” what he had said earlier. On one occasion when Hartnett pointed out that he was saying the opposite of what he had said the previous day in court, Rupert retorted: “I do not recall what I said yesterday … you’ve done your job this morning, you have me thoroughly confused.” On another occasion during the trial Mr Hartnett pointed out to the court where Rupert, in answer to questions from the defence on the previous day said “he couldn’t recall” on 254 different occasions.

However, the court, in their judgement pointed out how they were impressed by Rupert’s recall, which was bizarre and in stark contrast to Rupert’s performance while under cross-examination.


 

 

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The Blanket - A Journal of Protest & Dissent



 

 

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Index: Current Articles



19 July 2006

Other Articles From This Issue:

Dupe Process
Anthony McIntyre

Heatwave Won't Affect Cold Storage
Dr John Coulter

Hanson's Handouts
John Kennedy

Israeli State Terror
Anthony McIntyre

Judgement Day
John Kennedy

Israel, US and the New Orientalism
M. Shahid Alam

The Right, the Need to Resist
Mick Hall

An Invitation to My Neighborhood
Fred A Wilcox

Prison Fast
RPAG

Death Brings Fr Faul
Anthony McIntyre

Risking the Death of Volunteers is Not the IRA Way
Brendan Hughes

Principles and Tactics
Liam O Ruairc

The Framing of Michael McKevitt: Preliminary Hearings Cont'd.
Marcella Sands

The Framing of Michael McKevitt: Rupert's Reward
Marcella Sands

The Framing of Michael McKevitt: Rupert's Inconsistencies
Marcella Sands

Blast from the Past
John Kennedy

An Elegant End
Seaghán Ó Murchú

West Belfast - The Past, the Present and the Future
Davy Carlin


9 July 2006

Father Faul Saved Many Lives
Richard O'Rawe

Richard O'Rawe, PSF, and Events in 1981
Gerard Foster

Looking Back on 1981
Anthony McIntyre

Haughey and the National Question
Maria McCann

Brits Not to Blame for Haughey
David Adams

Greenfest
John Kennedy

Euston Manifesto: Yesterday's News
Mick Hall

Considering A Multi-Faceted Approach to the Middle East
Mehdi Mozaffari

Book Better Than Its Title
Seaghán Ó Murchú

Crowning Mr Unionist
Dr John Coulter

Extra Time Will Not Be Decisive
David Adams

'Pretty Much a Busted Flush'
Anthony McIntyre

Orangefest
John Kennedy

Just Books Web-launch
Jason Brannigan

The Framing of Michael McKevitt: Omagh, David Rupert, MI5 & FBI Collusion
Marcella Sands

The Framing of Michael McKevitt
Marcella Sands

The Framing of Michael McKevitt: Preliminary Hearings
Marcella Sands

Jury Duty Free State
Dolours Price

Even the Obnoxious
Anthony McIntyre

 

 

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